Tag Archives: watermelon

How To Tap A Watermelon

watermelon8If you’re looking for a way to amp up your summer get-together that requires minimal effort but delights even the most cynical New Englander, look no further. For some unknown reason, filling a non-conventional vessel with fresh juice and booze provokes giddiness and pure joy. I should know – I’ve tapped countless pumpkins and pineapples and still get excited to see fresh cocktails come out of the spout.

Below are some tips and instructions on how to tap a summer classic – the watermelon. With a couple of simple tools and about 20 minutes of effort (tops), you (and your watermelon) will be the hit of the summer.

I used our June Spirit of the Month, Square One Cucumber Vodka (on sale now!), to spike our juice, but feel free to get creative and mix it up with other spirits. Whether you want to tap a watermelon (or a cantaloupe)! you can follow these instructions. Add gin, vodka, tequila – whatever your heart desires, and feel free to garnish with fresh herbs for extra flair!

You will need:

1 watermelon (or fruit vessel of your choice)
1 keg spout (Amazon is your friend – it shouldn’t cost more than $15)
A cutting board
A chef’s knife
A paring knife
A large, sturdy spoon or ice cream scoop
A large bowl
A small bowl (to rest the melon on)
A blender
Booze of your choice (a 750ml bottle is plenty for average sized melons), such as Square One Cucumber Vodka, on sale thru July 2017!

When selecting your melon, look for one that can stand upright on its own and has somewhat of a flat-sided surface (that’s where you’ll put your tap). For a juicy watermelon, be sure to select one with a yellow base or side. It may not be pretty to look at, but it’s a sign that the melon is ripe, as the yellow spot is where it sat during the ripening process.

Using the chef’s knife, level the bottom of your melon (if it doesn’t stand totally straight on its own). Cut slowly, taking off just a little at a time. The exposed fruit should be mostly pith and rind, with little to no pink showing.
watermelon2
Next, cut 1/4 off of the top of the melon, giving yourself enough room to scoop out the flesh and plenty of space to insert the spout. Scoop out the insides, reserving them in your large bowl. Be careful not to scoop too close to the bottom. Save the top as a lid for the finished watermelon “keg.”
watermelon3Place the small bowl upside down and rest your melon on it. From there you can gauge where you’d like to insert the spout. Keep in mind that it will have to be submerged low within in the cocktail for it to work, but not so low that your guests will have a hard time pouring into their drink. I’ve always had luck cutting about two inches below the middle of the melon.

Once you have your designated spot, make an indentation by carefully putting medium pressure on the pourer, and twisting it lightly into the fruit. Once you have an outline, carefully use your paring knife to cut the hole out, starting out small and cutting away slowly, stopping now and then to test and see if your pourer fits.
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Once your spout is inserted, assemble the washers inside the melon according to the manufacturer’s instructions. These washers will hold the spout in place.

Next, put the fruit you’ve carved out of the melon into a blender, and liquify.

Now you’re ready to assemble your cocktail. I recommend using a 3:1 ratio of juice to booze. This keeps the cocktail fairly light if you’re out soaking up the New England sun on a hot day. The ratio will change, though, based on the size of your melon. If it’s on the larger size, you’ll want to use a touch more spirit.
watermelon7Once you have your liquids measured, add them to your melon, stir, and get to drinking! If you plan on putting the top of the melon back on to cover the juice, keep it slightly ajar, as some air circulation is needed to ensure a robust cocktail stream.

Serve over ice, and garnish with fresh mint, basil or cucumber.
watermelon9I’ll be serving our Watermelon Cucumber Vodka Cooler from a watermelon in store on Saturday, July 1st, from 2-4pm. Come on by and I’d be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Cheers – have fun with this, and Happy Summer!
-Alex

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Watermelon Pairs with Rosé Wine: Le Caprice de Clémentine

watermelon and rosé wine pairing idea

When it’s hot as habaneros, you want something refreshing, cold, juicy, sweet…watermelon! Luckily, this bright red melon is newly in season here in Rhode Island. The next logical question is, what do you drink with it? We’ve tasted a slew of wines and found through our research that rosé wins for the best wine pairing. Keep reading for quirky recipe ideas and reasons why you need to try Le Caprice de Clémentine.

In Season Now: Watermelon
Mid-July – September

Watermelons are a quintessential summer treat. Whether they are served for breakfast, enjoyed cold after dinner, or combined with other ingredients to make salads, drinks, desserts, or cold soups, you’ll be hard pressed to find a more perfect summer ingredient.

Wine Pairing

What wine says summer? Rosé! Right between a red and white wine, rosés are dry, and not sweet like White Zinfandel or Blush wines. Rosé from the Côtes de Provence region in France are known for their gold standard quality and joie de vivre lifestyle. Their signature light, crisp, berry and citrusy flavors are a perfect complement to fresh, sweet watermelon. Serve them both refreshingly cold, and enjoy on a hot summer day!

Recommended Wine:
  • Aromas of watermelon! It’s like double watermelon. Trust us.
  • A light and delicate rosé with beautiful color and good acidity to preserve freshness.
  • Overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, Le Château Les Valentines is a wine growing estate in the south of France that is more than a century old.
  • In 1997, Les Valentines family decided to make their own wine, and built a modern winery called the Domain “Les Valentines.”
Find more food wine pairings! Click Here >