Tag Archives: edible rhody

Local Wine that Pairs with Winter Vegetable Soup

soup_2017

It’s hot soup season here on the east coast. Time to put up a big batch each week to nourish, warm, comfort and sustain your family throughout the upcoming cold New England winter. This version, from Bacaro’s Chef/Owner Brian Kingsford, relies on a homemade vegetable stock fortified with Parmigiano Reggiano rinds which lend the soup a rich, complex flavor that only the king of cheeses can bring.

To match the soup’s deep flavors, our Eric Taylor chose a local gem from Johnston’s Verde Vineyards. It’s made from St. Croix, an American grape bred for flavor and to withstand harsh New England winters. The resulting wine has soft tannins, silky texture and lively but dry red berry flavors that play beautifully with the earthiness of the root vegetables, and the nutty, complex flavors of the cheesy broth.

Winter Root Vegetable & Farro Soup
from Chef/owner Brian Kingsford, Bacaro, Providence

A note from the chef: “While you could use store-bought vegetable broth for this soup, it just can’t compete with the good flavor of homemade broth, enhanced by the Parmigiano-Reggiano rinds. And it will contain far less sodium too. Simply make the stock in advance, refrigerate (or freeze) and then make soup at your leisure. At the restaurant we drizzle the soup with a quality extra-virgin olive oil: Zisola, a robust oil from Sicily.”

Ingredients
1 small sweet potato
2 carrots, peeled and diced
2 parsnips, peeled and diced
1 medium white (Macomber) turnip
1 small sweet onion, such as Vidalia
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 bunches kale
1 cup farro
Kosher salt
2½ quarts (10 cups) Vegetable-Parm Stock*
Parmigiano-Reggiano for serving
Quality extra-virgin olive oil for serving

Method
Heat olive oil in a large heavy-bottomed stockpot. Add the sweet potato, carrots, parsnips, turnip and onion and sauté on high heat for about 5 minutes, or until vegetables are slightly caramelized. Rinse kale under cool running water. Trim the tough stalks from the leaves and slice leaves into ribbons. (Use stalks for Vegetable-Parm Stock.)

Add vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and add the farro. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add kale and simmer for 15 more minutes, or until both the kale and the farro are tender. Add salt to taste. Ladle soup into bowls, and garnish with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano and drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil.

Serves 8.

*Vegetable-Parm Stock:

Ingredients
1 pound sweet onion, peeled and chopped in ½-inch dice
5 carrots, peeled and chopped in ½-inch dice
½ pound fennel, trimmed and chopped in ½-inch dice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 ounces (1 cup) crimini mushroom, cleaned and roughly chopped, including stems
1 stalk celery, roughly chopped 1–2 medium (½ pound) turnips, such as Macomber
Kale stalks from soup prep, roughly chopped (optional)
1 tomato, cored and roughly chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
1 bay leaf
7 whole black peppercorns
3 pieces Parmigiano-Reggiano rinds
6 quarts (24 cups) water
Kosher salt

Method
Preheat oven to 400°. Toss the onion, carrots and fennel in olive oil and place on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until the vegetables start to caramelize, approximately 15–20 minutes. Remove from oven and place vegetables in a large, heavy-bottomed stockpot.

Meanwhile prep the mushrooms, celery, turnip, kale stalks, tomato and garlic and add to the pot with the bay leaf, black peppercorns and Parmigiano-Reggiano rinds with the water.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer, cooking uncovered until liquid is reduced by half. Strain out solids from the stock. Season with salt to taste. This recipe should yield roughly 2½ quarts (10 cups) of vegetable stock.

Bon Appetit, and Cheers!

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Wine to Pair with Roasted Cauliflower Soup

riegel_160729_0251-2016-07-29-at-00-00-00

photo credit: Edible Rhody

With cooler, fall nights upon us, the soul starts to crave rich, creamy, nourishing soups. Ben Lloyd, Chef-Owner of The Salted Slate (just a hop and a skip from Bottles) has a satisfying roasted cauliflower situation that fits the bill. He’s shared his recipe in the current issue of Edible Rhody, and we’re happy to re-post it here, along with our wine pick, the Palagetto Vernaccia “Santa Chiara” DOCG.

santa
Made from 100% Vernaccia grapes grown in the town of San Gimignano in Tuscany, this beautiful white is crisp enough to cut through the soup’s rich creaminess, and steely enough to match the cauliflower flavor. Its touch-of-fruitiness on the finish plays nicely with the hazelnut, too.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER SOUP
Says Chef-Owner Ben Lloyd, The Salted Slate, Providence: “Roasting the vegetables for this recipe converts starches to sugars more thoroughly than boiling them, creating a deeper and richer soup with more cauliflower flavor.”

Ingredients
1 large Spanish onion, peeled, halved and sliced
1 bulb fennel, trimmed, halved and roughly chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 medium head cauliflower, cleaned, trimmed and roughly chopped
6 cloves peeled garlic
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt
Ground white pepper
4 tablespoons (half stick) unsalted butter
2 fresh bay leaves (or substitute dried)
5 cups low-sodium vegetable or chicken stock
¼ cup plain Greek-style yogurt
2 cups heavy cream
3 tablespoons finely minced chives
3–4 tablespoons hazelnuts, toasted and chopped
Hazelnut oil (optional garnish)

Preheat oven to 425°. Toss the vegetables with olive oil and season with 2 teaspoons salt and a pinch of white pepper. Place them on a large baking sheet in the oven. When vegetables are roasted but not too browned (about 15 minutes), remove from oven.

In a medium sauce pot melt butter and add roasted vegetables along with 2 bay leaves. Add stock to cover the vegetables and add 1 tablespoon salt.

Bring to a boil then quickly reduce to a simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the bay leaves.

Purée soup in a blender, then add yogurt and cream. Quickly pulse soup to distribute the cream and yogurt. Optionally, strain the soup through a fine-mesh sieve for a more refined velvety-textured soup.Return to pot and season with salt to taste.

Serve in warm bowls topped with minced chives, a sprinkle of the hazelnuts and a few drops of hazelnut oil.

Yields approximately 2½ quarts  of soup.

Bon Appetit, and Cheers!

A Mushroom Wine Pairing

Photo by Chip Riegel

The humble mushroom is a cook’s best friend, given its amazing flavor and texture, versatility and nearly year-around availability in local farmer’s markets. It’s also beloved in the wine world as it has a natural affinity for so many different wine grapes and styles.

When pairing wine with mushrooms, consider their power: delicate varieties (the chanterelle, the oyster, for example) play best with light to medium bodied wines. Meaty ‘shrooms (portobello) love big, bold styles.

For the following dish of blue oyster mushrooms roasted with grape tomatoes and tarragon (from the Winter 2015 edition of Edible Rhody), we zeroed in on the texture of the mushrooms: roasting adds a richness to their delicate nature, calling for a medium-bodied wine. We also wanted to complement the dish’s other ingredients and aromatics: tomatoes and tarragon. And for this we turned to Italy for a white and a red that work well with acid and herbs.

oyster

2014 Cantine Colosi, Nero d’Avola, Sicily There’s a supple cherry fruitiness in this medium-bodied bottle that is a lovely balance to the oyster mushroom’s delicate earthiness, and its menthol finish is just delicious with the dish’s tarragon notes. The nero d’avola grape – the superstar of Sicily – is a natural match for tomatoes.

2013 Argillae Orvieto, Umbria This blend is a beautiful example of the savory white wines Italy is known for. It has floral and tropical notes that add a brightness to the roasted dish, but it is its savory, almond notes that we prize with the mushroom’s earthy flavor and the warm licorice aromas from the tarragon.

ROASTED BLUE OYSTER MUSHROOMS WITH GRAPE TOMATOES AND FRESH HERBS
Co-owner Bob DiPietro, RI Mushroom Co., South Kingstown

Just about any type of fresh herbs can be used in this recipe—just be careful they don’t overwhelm the dish. Use less of stronger herbs like rosemary or sage than you would basil or tarragon. You can also substitute different mushrooms or opt for a mix. (Total cooking time may vary.)  Bottles’ Note: we like to use tarragon in this dish, and think it’s sublime served over pasta.

¾–1 pound (5–6 cups) blue oyster mushrooms
1 cup (½ pint) grape tomatoes, washed and halved
2–3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1–2 tablespoons red wine or cider vinegar*
2 medium cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
2 tablespoons mix of chopped fresh tarragon, thyme or Italian flat leaf parsley, divided
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 400°. Spray a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray or brush with olive oil.
Trim off woody stems of the mushrooms and reserve for another use (a terrific addition to homemade stock). Shred the remaining mushrooms lengthwise into a large bowl.

Add tomatoes, olive oil, vinegar, garlic and 1 tablespoon herbs. Toss well.

Arrange the mixture in a single layer on the baking sheet and roast for 30 minutes, turning halfway through to ensure even browning.

Remove from oven, add remaining herbs and season with salt and pepper to taste. (I always add salt at the very end whenever cooking mushrooms, otherwise they will exude their natural juices.)

May be served as a side dish, tossed with pasta or as a topping for steak or burgers. Serves 4.

* Instead of vinegar you can use pickle brine. I highly recommend the pickle brines from Rhode Island’s own Fox Point Pickling Co.

Cheers and Bon Appetit!

 

 

Wines to Pair with Butternut Squash Mac ‘n’ Cheese

Photo by Amy McCoy

Come ON … look at that photo … why are you still reading and not on your way to the market to pick up fixins to make this Butternut Squash Mac ‘n’ Cheese?  While you’re out, stop by Bottles for one (or more) of the wines we suggest to pair with this absolutely delicious, rich and comforting dish. (Recipe below, courtesy of Edible Rhody.)

White Wine:

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Evolucio Furmint. Grown primarily in the Tokaj region of Hungary, the furmint grape produces both sweet and dry wines. This crisp, refreshing easy-drinking bottle is a dry version, though given its ripe apple and floral aromas, it presents as a touch on the sweeter side. Which means it will echo the beautiful sweet squash, and its tangy acidity will slice through all that cheese.

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Souscherie Savennieres Clos Des Perrieres. One of our favorite expressions of the chenin blanc grape is the beautiful wine made in the Savennieres region of France’s Loire Valley. This medium bodied, stunning and very special bottle has notes of honey and apricot (both of which have a natural affinity for cheese) and a vanilla finish, which is a lovely complement to butternut squash.

Red Wine:

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Caiado Red Blend.
A mix of cabernet sauvignon and two other relatively-obscure red grapes from Portugal, this terrific-value-of-a-bottle bursts with juicy fruit, is slick with silky tannins and is low in alcohol – all things we like when pairing wine with cheese-based dishes. It reminds us of the jam on a well-crafted cheese board: it’s the bright, sweeter yin to the cheese’s rich, creamy yang.

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Laurence Remi Dufaitre Cote de Brouilly. Most wine pros have the gamay grape on their short list of wines that match mac ‘n’ cheese really well. And given its lighter style, and fruit-forward elegance, we have to agree. This in particular is a really fun, organic bottle from one of the more pristine of the Beaujolis cru. It’s succulent with bright fruit and a crispy acidity which will complement the squash and the cheese in equal measure.

FARMERS’ MAC ‘N’ CHEESE WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH
By Amy McCoy, author of Poor Girl Gourmet and founder/blogger of TinyFarmhouse.com

Master recipe (serves 4–6):
3¼ to 3½ pounds whole butternut squash, peeled, seeded and sliced into ½-inch rounds
Extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound pasta, such as ziti or penne rigate, prepared al dente according to the manufacturer’s instructions
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
6 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour
4 cups (1 quart) whole milk, warmed
8 ounces (approximately 4 cups), grated sharp cheese (Narragansett Creamery Atwell’s Gold, cheddar cheese or a mix), divided
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional)
1 teaspoon fresh or dried thyme
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 375°. Lightly oil a 13- by 9-inch baking dish. In a large mixing bowl, toss the squash with 1 tablespoon olive oil, then transfer to a large, rimmed baking sheet and arrange in a single layer.

Roast on the middle rack for 50 to 55 minutes, until the edges are golden brown, and the squash easily mashes with a fork.

Remove from the oven, allow to cool slightly. Transfer squash to a mixing bowl and mash.

(Can be done a day ahead of time and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator overnight.)

Place cooked pasta in a large mixing bowl.

Then make the béchamel sauce. Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add flour gradually, using a whisk to blend it into the butter. Cook until the mixture is a light caramel brown shade, approximately 5 to 7 minutes, being careful not to burn. Slowly add the warmed milk, whisking constantly to keep the mixture from clumping. Cook over medium heat, whisking frequently, until the sauce is the consistency of pancake batter, approximately 10 to 12 minutes.

Remove the sauce from the heat, stir in half the shredded cheese and sprinkle with nutmeg, then season with salt and pepper.

Add the butternut squash and stir to combine evenly throughout the sauce. Mix the butternut-béchamel sauce with the pasta, stirring well to combine, then transfer to the baking dish. Top with remaining cheese, sprinkle with thyme leaves, season with salt and pepper and bake until the cheese is golden brown and the sauce is bubbling, 30 to 35 minutes.

Notes: Can be prepared up to the point of topping with added cheese then covered and refrigerated for up to 1 day. Please note that the cooking time may need to be increased as the ingredients will be starting from a colder temperature right out of the refrigerator.

For a slightly creamier finished dish, increase the milk to 5 cups.

Bon Appetit!

Roasted Leg of Lamb with Chateau Magneau Rouge

lamb_rhodyThe Chateau Magneau Rouge is a very dry wine, with only hints of red fruit flavors. It has loads of minerality from the granite-rich soil which predominates the sub-region of Graves in which its grapes are grown and it’s precisely this lean, mineral style that makes it an excellent pairing with lamb, cranberries, and roasted root vegetables. It’s also a smart choice for a classic roast chicken.

ROASTED LEG OF LAMB WITH QUINCE CRANBERRY PAN SAUCE AND ROASTED VEGETABLES
-Chef/Owner Ben Lloyd, The Salted Slate, Providence

Says Chef Ben: “I buy my lamb from Don and Debbie Hopkins from their farm Hopkins Southdowns in North Scituate, Rhode Island. Marinating the lamb overnight gives it a wonderful flavor. I like to serve it with gnocchi or polenta alongside the roasted vegetables.”

INGREDIENTS:

Lamb:
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
½ cup roughly chopped garlic
¼ cup crushed coffee beans
6 sprigs each fresh rosemary and thyme, stemmed and leaves chopped
1 (3½- to 4-pound) boneless leg of lamb, tied or netted
2 shallots, peeled, trimmed and diced
2 (1 pound) quince (or substitute Bartlett pears), peeled, cored and diced
½ cup cranberries
3 stalks celery, diced
1 cup dry cooking sherry (or red wine)
1½ cups lamb, chicken or beef stock
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Roasted Vegetables:
2 bulbs (about 1 pound) kohlrabi, trimmed, scrubbed, halved and sliced ¼-inch thick
1 (about 1 pound) Macomber turnip, peeled and cut into batons (2- by ½-inch sticks)
½ pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
2 shallots, peeled, trimmed and chopped
6 whole garlic cloves, peeled and halved

INSTRUCTIONS:
In a small saucepan, warm 1 cup olive oil, ½ cup chopped garlic, crushed coffee beans, rosemary and thyme until herbs just begin to sizzle. Remove from heat and cool. Place lamb in a large bowl and pour marinade over the lamb, filling any little cavities with pieces of garlic/herbs. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Remove lamb from refrigerator 1 hour before cooking. Preheat oven to 450°.

Place shallots in a flameproof roasting pan with quince, cranberries and celery. Add ¼ cup marinade from the lamb and toss. Place lamb atop mixture (be sure to reserve any remaining marinade). Generously season lamb with salt and pepper.

Roast lamb for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 325°. After 40 minutes check lamb with an instant read thermometer. For medium rare, remove lamb when it reaches 125° (or 130° for medium). It will reach 135° (or 145° for medium) while resting. Transfer lamb to a warm resting plate and cover loosely with foil.

For the roasted vegetables, return oven to 450°. In a large roasting pan, toss kohlrabi, turnip, Brussels sprouts, shallots and garlic cloves with ¼ cup remaining marinade. Season well with salt and pepper. Bake for 15 minutes or until vegetables just begin to brown and caramelize.

As the veggies roast, heat lamb roasting pan on high heat for about 2 minutes. As things start to bubble, add the sherry and reduce by half (about 2 minutes), then add stock. Continue to boil and reduce liquid to 1 cup. Season to taste.

To serve, you can either strain the sauce or serve it over the lamb with its fruits and veggies, according to your liking. Serve lamb alongside the additional roasted vegetables. Serves 6 as a main course.

Bon Appetit!

Pork Chops with Lenore Syrah

wood_grilled_erPhoto by Chip Riegel

Syrah is, in my mind, Washington’s grape and the Lenore is a great example why.  Brimming with dark and brooding fruit flavors and a little bit of a smoky flavor, this is a perfect pairing with Edible Rhody Magazine’s grilled pork chops and rich Soffritto .

Treat yourself to a perfect pairing with this delicious recipe.

fallwines-lenore-vert-1Corvidae Wine Co. Lenore Syrah

WOOD-GRILLED PORK CHOPS OVER CANNELLINI SOFFRITTO WITH RADICCHIO

by Chef/Co-owner Brian Kingsford, Bacaro, Providence

INGREDIENTS

Brined Pork Chops

1 cup dark brown sugar

1 cup salt

2 tablespoons fennel seed

2 tablespoons black peppercorns

3 sprigs each fresh rosemary, thyme and sage

6 cups hot water

6 (12- to 14-ounce) double cut pork loin chops

Soffritto

½ pound pancetta, diced into ⅛-inch cubes

Olive oil

2 cloves garlic

2 onions, finely diced

3 carrots, finely diced

2 celery stalks, finely diced

3 sprigs thyme

6 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 (14-ounce) cans cannellini beans, drained

¼ cup chicken broth

Kosher or sea salt

1 small head radicchio, stemmed, chopped in thin ribbons, rinsed and dried

Honeyed Onions (for garnish)**

Extra-virgin olive oil (good quality)

¼ cup aged balsamic vinegar, best available**

½ cup stemmed and chopped fresh flat leaf parsley

DIRECTIONS

To prepare the brine, in a large bowl or nonreactive container add brown sugar, salt, fennel seed, peppercorns, rosemary, thyme and sage to 6 cups hot water. Stir until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add pork chops and additional cold water until chops are fully submerged. Refrigerate overnight (or at least 12 hours). Discard brine after use.

On the day of preparation, preheat grill or prepare coals and preheat oven to 450°. Mark chops on the grill on both sides, about 5 minutes total. (Alternatively, sear chops in 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat, searing evenly on all sides.) Once chops are marked or browned, place in a roasting pan and roast until pork chops reach 130° (using an instant-read meat thermometer placed in the center), checking after 20 minutes. Let rest for at least 8 minutes before serving.

Meanwhile, prepare the soffritto. Sauté pancetta over medium heat in 1 tablespoon olive oil until fat is rendered. Add garlic and stir until mixture is fragrant. Add vegetables and thyme, and sauté until vegetables are softened. Add cannellini beans and chicken broth, making a thickened stew-like consistency, adding more broth if too thick. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and add butter. Season with salt to taste.

To serve, divide radicchio among 6 warm dinner plates. Ladle soffritto over radicchio and scatter the honeyed onions. Place chops atop vegetables. Drizzle with aged balsamic vinegar, extra-virgin olive oil and fresh parsley. Serve immediately. Serves 6 as main course.

Honeyed Onions **

¼ cup local wildflower honey

¼ cup good-quality red wine vinegar

1 onion, halved and thinly sliced

 DIRECTIONS

Combine honey and vinegar in saucepan on low heat. Add sliced onions and cook for about 5 minutes, until onions are softened. Can be made a day in advance and refrigerated. Bring back to room temperature before serving.

Quick-Aged Balsamic Vinegar **

¾ cup light brown sugar

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

 DIRECTIONS

Place brown sugar in a small saucepan with about 2 tablespoons of water. Apply heat just to melt the sugar and water to a thickened consistency. Add the vinegar and stir. If needed, reduce very gently over a low flame until desired thickness is achieved. (The balsamic will thicken once cold as well.) The longer heat is applied, the less the flavor resembles an aged balsamic vinegar, so try not to scorch or overheat.

Sumptuous Wine Pairing for Savory Seafood Dishes

Seafood Wine Pairing

Photo by Chip Riegel

Home-made seafood dishes deserve an equally tasty wine.

The Devil’s Advocate (named for those who dismiss Chardonnay) is not a oaky butter bomb, but rather lithe and studded with tropical fruit.

This will be especially great with Edible Rhody Magazine’s rustic seafood dish, Haddock and Clams with White Wine, Potatoes and Escarole.

This Chardonnay has sherry like notes that will go really well with the haddock (or cod) and the clams.

A great cold weather wine with a cold weather seafood dinner!

Southold Wine - Devils Advocate

Southold Farms and Cellar Devil’s Advocate Chardonnay

HADDOCK AND CLAMS WITH WHITE WINE, POTATOES AND ESCAROLE

by Steve Johnson, The Red Dory, Tiverton

INGREDIENTS

½ pound salt cod, cut into small pieces
1 small onion, peeled and sliced
1 medium leek, cut into thin rounds and rinsed well
2 russet potatoes, peeled and cut into half-rounds
1 small head escarole, stem removed, chopped and rinsed well
2 large cloves garlic, chopped
½ cup olive oil, plus more for serving
1 cup white wine
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
4 cups water
1 (15-ounce) can white beans, drained
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Pinch red pepper flakes
1 lemon
8 (3- to 4-ounce) fresh boneless, skinless thick haddock or cod filets
1 tablespoon canola oil
32–40 littleneck clams, scrubbed
Minced parsley or chives for garnish
Focaccia bread

DIRECTIONS

Soak the salt cod in cold water in a large bowl for 4 hours, changing the water 3 times, and then drain, discarding the water.

Place the salt cod, onion, leeks, potatoes, escarole, garlic, olive oil, wine, thyme and water in a large stockpot, bring to a boil, reduce heat and let it simmer gently for about 1 hour. The russet potatoes should just start to thicken the stew. Add the beans and season to taste. (Can be made a day in advance, refrigerated overnight.)

When ready to serve, heat 1 tablespoon canola oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add 4 fish fillets at a time (without crowding, so they brown properly) and sear until golden on 1 side, then remove to a plate next to stove. Repeat for next 4 filets. Return fish to skillet, seared side up, add clams, cover and heat until clams are open.

Meanwhile, double-check the broth for seasoning, adding a sprinkle of salt or a squeeze of lemon juice if necessary (and you might want to add some of the liquid from the sauté pan to the soup pot).

To serve, ladle broth in 8 warm shallow bowls and place a cod filet and 4–5 clams in each with a sprinkle of parsley or chives, a drizzle of olive oil and a wedge of lemon. (You can also offer this buffet style and let guests serve themselves.) Serve with thick slices of toasted focaccia to soak up the broth. Serves 8.

Definitely This Wine with Fall Salads

BOSTON_BIBB

What food and wine pairing will taste like a party in your mouth?

Edible Rhody Magazine’s Boston Bibb Salad and Ravines Riesling.

Typically, acidic salad dressings are hard to pair with wine – they make the wine taste bitter.

However the fresh apple cider sweetens this dressing and pairs perfectly with this fruity but bone-dry Riesling.

Brimming with flavors peak-of-summer fruit flavors like peach and nectarines, this will go especially well with the spiced pecans and cheddar cheese in the recipe.

Woo-hoo to fall salads!

 

Ravines Riesling - Finger Lakes Wine

RAVINES RIESLING

Great wine from the Finger Lakes region. Dry & crisp without being sweet.

Flavors of peach, honeysuckle, and a crisp ripe lemon/lime finish.

Try with dishes that include apples, like Edible Rhody Magazine’s Boston Bibb Salad.

Cheers!
– Eric Taylor, Bottles General Manager

 

Boston Bibb Salad with Apples and Pecans

Photo by Chip Riegel

BOSTON BIBB SALAD WITH APPLE CIDER VINAIGRETTE

by Steve Johnson, The Red Dory, Tiverton

At the restaurant, our vinaigrettes tend to be on the slightly acidic side, but this one is a touch sweeter thanks to the addition of fresh apple cider.

SALAD

INGREDIENTS
1–2 heads Boston Bibb lettuce, trimmed, washed and dried

1 small red onion, peeled and thinly sliced
1 cup cubed semi-sharp Vermont cheddar cheese (we use Grafton cheddar)
½ cup dried cranberries
3 tablespoons minced fresh chives
Spiced Pecans*
Apple Cider Vinaigrette**

DIRECTIONS
Divided among 8 salad plates, arrange lettuce, red onion, cheese and cranberries as desired. Sprinkle with pecans and fresh chives. Dress with Apple Cider Vinaigrette. Serves 8 as an appetizer.

* SPICED PECANS

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 tablespoon kosher or sea salt
½ teaspoon paprika
½ teaspoon chili powder
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
8 tablespoons (¼ pound) melted butter
4 cups pecans (or your favorite combination of nuts)

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 350°. In a mixing bowl, blend the sugar, salt and spices. Pour in the melted butter and stir to mix. Add the pecans and toss to coat evenly. Spread the seasoned nuts out on a baking sheet and roast them for 12 minutes or so. (There should be more than enough pecans for the salad, with some to snack on too!)

** APPLE CIDER VINAIGRETTE

INGREDIENTS
⅔ cups cider vinegar

¼ cup fresh apple cider
2 medium shallots, peeled and thinly sliced
1½ teaspoons grainy mustard
½ teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
½ cup good olive oil
1 cup canola oil
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS
In a mixing bowl, whisk together all of the ingredients to make the vinaigrette. Double-check the seasoning.

 

Malbec Paired with Cornbread & Chorizo Stuffing!

stuffingSometimes, it’s fun to do a twist on your traditional Thanksgiving dishes, and Edible Rhody’s Corn Bread and Chorizo Stuffing recipe is a great choice to liven things up. Enjoy with a big glass of rich, delicious Malbec!

The little bit of spice from both the chorizo and the cayenne and the big ripe fruit flavors of La Posta Pizzella Vineyard Malbec will be perfect together.  Plus, if you are going to slather the stuffing in gravy, you’ll be glad you have this beautiful Malbec to cut through all the richness.

pizzella-web

CORN BREAD AND CHORIZO STUFFING
Owners Nick & Tracy Rabar, Avenue N American Kitchen & The Pantry at Avenue N, Rumford

You’ve got to have some fun and break tradition from time to time. This recipe came from that style of thinking—and it’s a great example of our ever-evolving Thanksgiving menu. It feeds a big crowd but can be divided easily.

½ loaf (8-inch length) Seven Stars pain de mie or other quality, dense white bread, cubed
1 small loaf (4 cups) corn bread, cubed
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 Vidalia onion, peeled and diced
2 jalapeño peppers, seeded and diced
1 red Bell pepper, seeded and diced
2 stalks celery, diced
4 small cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1 pound chorizo, casing removed
2 ears (1 cup) sweet corn, removed from cob
2 scallions, finely sliced
8 sprigs fresh thyme, stems removed
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 teaspoons kosher or sea salt
2–3 teaspoons Tabasco, or to taste
2 tablespoons honey
2 sticks (½ pound) unsalted butter, melted
2–4 cups chicken stock

Preheat oven to 350°.

Spread cubed breads on 2 large sheet pans, being careful not to crowd. Bake until lightly toasted, approximately 20 minutes. Remove from oven and cool.

Grease a large baking dish that doubles for serving. Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add onions, jalapeños, red pepper, celery and garlic and sauté until the onions are translucent (5 minutes). Add chorizo and stir to break up into small pieces until cooked through. Add corn and scallions; sauté another 5 minutes. Add cubed bread, thyme, chili powder, paprika, cayenne, salt, Tabasco, honey and butter and toss well. Add chicken broth until desired consistency is met. Stuffing should be moist but not soupy. Check for seasoning. Spoon stuffing into baking dish and bake uncovered for 40 minutes.
Makes approximately 15 cups or 12 servings.

I know my mouth is watering… Happy cooking!

Cheers, 

The Bottles Team

Sutto Prosecco & Holiday Salads!

carrot_webA glass of bubbly is a great way to start your Thanksgiving dinner! We’re digging on Sutto Prosecco (from our Top 9 Thanksgiving Wine List) — it’s fresh, vibrant, and a treat everyone will enjoy along with special holiday salads. Try pairing it with Edible Rhody’s Rainbow Carrot Salad with Toasted Cumin Vinaigrette, featured in their recent fall issue. 

prosecco-2-web

The Prosecco is a perfect match with the earthy sweet carrots, crunchy crisp radishes and salty/sweet feta cheese. The lively bubbles are a lively contrast to the flavors of the veggies and the savory qualities of the cumin vinaigrette.  A great way to start the meal!

RAINBOW CARROT SALAD WITH TOASTED CUMIN VINAIGRETTE
Ben Wood, WildWood Catering, Kingston

Thanksgiving falls right at a wonderful time of the New England harvest. Flavorful rainbow carrots are among the bounty. Serve this raw carrot salad at your feast as a vibrant contrast to the traditional Thanksgiving fare.

Salad:

2 pounds rainbow carrots, well-washed
¼ cup fresh chives, cleaned and chopped
¼ cup flat-leaf parsley, cleaned and chopped
6–8 Breakfast radishes
1 cup (¼ pound) Narragansett Creamery Salty Sea Feta, crumbled
Grated zest of ½ lemon
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Edible flowers (optional)

Dressing:

½ teaspoon ground cumin
3 tablespoon sugar
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
½ cup extra-virgin olive oil

For salad, trim carrot tops and, using a vegetable peeler, shave the carrots lengthwise into long, thin 3- to 4-inch ribbons. Place carrot ribbons into bowl. Toss in herbs with carrots. Slice radishes lengthwise as thin as possible; use mandolin if accessible.

For dressing, heat small skillet on medium heat for 1 minute, add ground cumin and cook for 1 minute, shaking pan constantly, or until cumin is slightly darkened and fragrant. In a small bowl add vinegar and sugar together, then whisk in toasted cumin and olive oil. Add a pinch of salt and pepper to taste.

To serve, season carrots and herbs with dressing just before serving and top with feta cheese, shaved radishes, a sprinkle of salt, pepper and lemon zest. Garnish with edible flowers if possible—we love Indie Growers in Bristol! Serves 6–8 people as a first course.

Enjoy this fun and creative dish! Cin Cin!

Cheers, 

The Bottles Team