The Top 9 Spring & Kosher Wines, Part I

For some reason, it seems as if all of our guests are looking forward to the arrival of true spring weather this year more than ever before. We don’t have an in with Mother Nature, but we can certainly help you set a springtime mood with the wine you put on your table. Here’s what we think are the best of the bunch to do just that this year, as well as those that will be excellent at your seder.

spring22Our Kosher for Passover Picks

The Butcher’s Daughter, Bordeaux, France, $19.99
A great wine that just happens to be kosher for Passover, this Bordeaux blend is ripe with a bouquet of cassis and raspberry fruit, and a deep cocoa character. Made to drink with your brisket or lamb roast.

Notte Italiana Prosecco, Veneto, Italy $17.99
These semi-sweet, happy bubbles pack a punch of bright green apple, but finish creamy and smooth with hints of vanilla. Wonderful with light appetizer fare for any spring festivity.

Lanzur Chardonnay, Valle del Maule, Chile $11.99
A big, bursting, round and juicy chardonnay with an oaky backbone that lends tons of structure and depth. Serve chilled next to an overflowing platter of latkes or pan-fried potatoes.

Looking for more kosher options? Come by or call the store to shop our expanded selection of over 75 seder-friendly wines.

spring1Non-Kosher Picks

Elk Cove Pinot Blanc, Willamette Valley, Oregon $19.99
Pinot Blanc is a grape you need to try for its vibrant, round and fruity notes. The Elk Cove has a tropical fruit flavor tinge that is balanced by an underlying, subtle, lemon zing. We love this wine for its incredible food-versatility, especially with lighter fare.

Zorzal ‘Terroir Unico’ Pinot Noir Rosé, Tupungato Valley, Argentina, $14.99
The grapes for the lovely Zorzal rosé were picked earlier than usual for this region, thus resulting in a wine with zippy acidity and a young (aka ‘green’) vibrancy. It’ll be superb with grilled or roasted meats & veggies, legumes and fish.

Tune in next week for the remaining bottles on our Top 9 list.

Cheers & Happy Spring!

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A Boozy Play List For Brandy Cocktails

Brandy’s dandy whether sipped after dinner, or when mixed into a cocktail, as we like to do. The classic Brandy Alexander, a creamy treat made popular in the early 20th century, still holds its own today, but for simpler, less-sweet brandy beverages consider the Brave & Strong, and Glory Days.

Both cocktails are from Copper & Kings, the Kentucky distiller that fashions its American brandies on American whiskey and American music. Yes, music: the distillery has five major sub-woofers in their maturation cellar through which they pulse music (a bass note in particular). This pulsation causes the brandy-filled barrels in the cellar to jostle, which increases the contact time between the brandy and the charred barrels. And if you remember your Aging 101 class, increased contact time = more complex flavor. Cool, right?

Don’t believe us? Visit the Copper & Kings website, scroll down to “Brandy Rocks” and listen to what the booze is boogie-ing to today. (As of this writing, it’s pulsing to blues guitarist Lightin’ Hopkins. Great stuff.)

And while you’re listening to what they’re spinning, mix up a few cocktails with — what else — Copper & King’s American Craft Brandy. (Which just happens to be $5 off at Bottles through March 31st.) We’ve got two for you today: one hot to usher out old-man winter and the other, a cold, refreshing version to welcome spring’s warmer days. Enjoy, and rock on.

brandy2
Brave & Strong
Add 1.5 oz. Copper & Kings American Craft Brandy and .5 oz. vanilla cream to a mug. (Homemade vanilla cream –  cream with a drop or two of pure vanilla extract – is best, though vanilla-flavored coffee creamer is a passable substitute. If you’re feeling decadent, use a scoop of all-natural vanilla ice-cream instead.) Top with freshly-brewed hot coffee. Stir, sip, and watch the ice melt away.

brandy1Glory Days
2 oz. Copper & Kings American Craft Brandy
1 12oz. Bottle of Hard Apple Cider (such as Stormalong Legendary Dry Cider or Shacksbury Classic).

Take a sip of brandy. Add a touch of cider to the brandy. Repeat at own pace and taste until glass is empty. Refill glass with more brandy. Repeat.

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5 Questions with Kate

kateMeet Kate Miceli, our newly minted wine assistant. Kate’s been with us for just over 6 months, and thanks to her extensive wine knowledge and uncanny ability to help customers find what they’re looking for, she was a no-brainer for this new role. As part of our ongoing efforts to help you drink better, she’ll be helping Nick manage our expanding wine collection, spending all of her time on the floor helping to understand your needs so that you leave with the perfect bottle.

Kate hails from Pleasantville, New York and is a graduate of Johnson & Wales, where she studied wine, culinary arts and nutrition. She’s an accomplished cook with professional experience, knows all about cheese, is a master oyster shucker, and loves to cook at home for her family and friends, and her pug.

Here’s more on Kate’s current wine thoughts:

What’s your favorite style of wine?
Dry white wine is my favorite style. Especially whites from Saint Joseph in the Northern Rhone Valley from the grapes marsanne and roussanne that are vibrant and golden in color, and have a lot of body and flavors of ripe nectarines, tropical fruits, and white flowers.  I find these wines to be perfect with a variety of foods.  Fried chicken, Thai curry, stuffed pork loin with pancetta, and roasted Cornish game hens are just a few things that I would love to drink with a good Northern Rhone wine.

What’s your go-to bottle of wine for dinner on a Tuesday night?
On a typical Tuesday night, I am probably cooking tacos for dinner. Spicy chicken or pork tacos! Ice-cold Pullus sauvignon blanc from Slovenia is delicious and makes for a great pairing. The wine has flavors of cape gooseberries and zesty limes!  It goes exceptionally well with avocado and fresh homemade Pico de Gallo too.

What bottle on our shelves do you most covet today?
One wine that brings me pure joy is Taurasi from the producer, Mastroberardino. This fantastic  ruby-red hued wine hails from Campania in Italy. This is what they drink in Naples!  It is comprised of 100% aglianico grapes and is multi-layered and very complex.  It is powerful, but quite elegant with flavors of bitter cherries, flint, fresh herbs, and cherry wood.  Drink with hearty meat roasts, truffles, fancied up pizza, and Bolognese.

In your opinion, what’s the most underrated wine style?
Wines from South Africa often get a bad rap.  My newest favorite vineyard from South Africa is Stellekaya. They make a fantastic Sangiovese called Hercules. The winemaker, Ntsiki Biyela, is the first female African American winemaker in South Africa.

What in the wine world are you most excited about today?
I’m excited about how natural wines are gaining popularity up here in New England.  They have been the real ‘it’ thing in Brooklyn and NYC for many years but now I see more and more of these fun ‘natural’ wines here in RI. To me, these wines are like drinking art. I also find it very exciting how many women are now a part of the wine world.  While it used to be a male dominated career, many strong women are changing that.

 

If you’re in need of a great wine recommendation, come by and find Kate – she’ll be glad to help you!

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Why Nick Put These Wines on Sale

casatripleThe stunning CasaSmith wines are on sale – a full $5 off – through April 30. Why’d Nick do such a thing?

  1. He wants you to drink better in 2017, and with these wines you can do just that.
  2. They’re a truly delicious old world/new world mashup, made with classic Tuscan, Piedmontese and Pugliese grape varieties grown on single vineyard estates in Washington State.
  3. You’ll get so much more than a $20 bottle of wine.
  4. They’re well crafted wines, meant to be enjoyed today.
  5. The wines are highly-rated (if you’re into that sort of thing).
  6. Just look at those labels.

Buyer Beware: Winemaker Charles Smith makes the CasaSmith wines in limited quantities, so try them early. If you like them as much as we do, be sure to pick up a few bottles before the vintage (and our sale) is gone.

casa_buck
2015 CasaSmith Cervo Barbera: Silky, plush, dark cherry, dried sage, mineral driven and earthbound.

casa_pig
2015 CasaSmith Cinghiale Sangiovese: Layer upon layer of Italian cherries, fresh herbs, rolled tobacco and blackberry. Depth for days and a finish that is an eternity.

casa_pine
2015 CasaSmith Porcospino Primitivo: Blackberry, boysenberry, pie crust and black tea. Ripe fruit, fresh oregano and fine tannins to boot.

Cheers!

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Cooking with Beer – Two Recipes

It’s cold out! When the February snow and wind hit, I like to hunker down with a hearty braise inspired by the land of “Cuisine à la Bière,” served with a vibrant green salad tossed with an orange IPA-flavored dressing.

You may know that Belgium has a long and proud brewing tradition that stretches back for hundreds of years. Beer is so deeply rooted in Belgian culture that it holds the same revered place on the table as wine does in France or Italy, and is used in many of the same ways. Cooking with beer can be a real treat, and this Belgian inspired one-pot meal is one of my favorites to make in the winter, especially on a long, cold, snowy Sunday.

The beer I’ve chosen to use in this dish comes from the esteemed Dubuisson brewery, the oldest in Wallonia (older than most Trappist breweries!). Their flagship beer, Scaldis Amber, is a 12% ABV take on an English Barleywine. It adds both fruity and savory notes to the roast, with flavors of ripe fruit and caramel, along with a hint of herbal hops and licorice. Although it’s high in alcohol, most of that will steam off while cooking, so don’t worry, this is a family-friendly pot roast!

Scaldis is something we regularly carry, but if you want to branch out, any Belgian-style Amber or Dark Ale will do. Some of our favorites for cooking (and drinking) include:

-Allagash Dubbel
-Rochefort ‘8’ or ‘10’
-St. Bernardus ‘Pater 6’
-North Coast ‘Brother Thelonious’

When it comes to pairing a beer to drink alongside this braise, do we really have to tell you what would go best? Scaldis Amber, of course! If that’s a little too strong for you, any of the aforementioned beers will also work quite nicely.

To learn more about the beer, check out Dubuisson’s excellent website: https://dubuisson.com/en-us, and check out https://dubuisson.com/en-us/our-beers/scaldis-amber for more on the Scaldis.

cookingbeer4Belgian Pot Roast
If you’re short on time, skip the steps below and instead use a slow cooker. You can put the whole shebang in on low before you go to work, then add the root veggies and turn it to high when you get home.

Ingredients:
4 – 5 pound beef rump roast or bottom round
¼ cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
(optional: ¼ tsp Old Bay seasoning or cinnamon for extra flavor)
2 tbsp olive oil or butter
2 large onions, cut in half & sliced into thick half moons
3 carrots, peeled & cut into cubes
1 big sprig of thyme
1 bay leaf
1 12 oz. bottle of Scaldis Amber
A mix of your favorite root vegetables to finish the roast: small potatoes, parsnips, rutabaga, etc., cut into bite-sized chunks.

Method:
Preheat oven to 325 F.

Mix the flour, salt & pepper (and the Old Bay or cinnamon, if using) in a big plastic container with a lid.

Heat a dutch oven or deep-sided casserole over medium–high heat.

Dry the roast well with paper towels and put it in the container with the flour mixture. Gently shake it up, down and all around to evenly coat the meat.

Warm the oil and/or butter in the dutch oven until hot (not smoking!). Tap off any excess flour and brown the meat on all sides, a few minutes per side.

Remove the meat to a plate to rest, turn the heat down to medium, and add the onions to all the beautiful brown bits left in the pan. If it seems dry, add another 1-2 teaspoons of oil or butter.

Cover the pot, and sauté the onions, stirring every 2 minutes or so until soft and just beginning to take on some color.

Push the onions to the sides of the pan, put the meat (with any juice on the plate) into the middle of the pan and add the carrots, thyme, a little salt and pepper, and the whole bottle of Scaldis. Mix everything up around the meat, scraping up any bits stuck to the pan.

Bring it gently to a boil, cover, and bake in your oven for about 3 ½ hours.

Meanwhile, scrub your root veggies and cut them into evenly sized chunks – about the size you’d want to put in your mouth after they’re cooked.

After 3 ½ hours, add your root veggies to the pot, stir them up a bit in the sauce, and leave to cook for another 30 minutes or so, or until the meat is falling apart.

Let the roast cool a bit, and eat it with a cold glass of Scaldis Amber!

cookingbeer2Orange & Ale Vinaigrette
To complement the rich roast I like to serve a vibrant, zesty salad that also uses beer as a main ingredient. With thanks to Sean Paxton of Home Brew Chef & BeerAdvocate, here’s one of my favorite salad dressings to make any time of year, but especially when I’m missing the sun.

Ingredients:
3 oz. IPA (I like any of the following for this recipe: Sierra Nevada Torpedo, Grey Sail Captain’s Daughter, Harpoon Hoppy Adventure, or Lost Nation Mosaic IPA – or just use your favorite)
1 tbsp minced shallot (or half a small onion, minced)
1 tsp grated orange zest
1 tbsp honey
1 tsp Dijon mustard
4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil (bring out the good stuff for this)
Salt and pepper to taste

Method:
Put the shallot, orange zest, honey and mustard in a small bowl and whisk in the beer until well combined.

Slowly whisk in the oil, a few drops at a time, until the whole thing is creamy and emulsified.

Drizzle your dressing over hearty greens, or blanched green beans, or asparagus, beets, hard boiled eggs, cucumbers, tomatoes, etc., you get the drift.

The dressing will keep in your fridge for about five days if you don’t eat it all first!

Enjoy! –Liam

Rare, Collectible and Affordable Wine in The Cellar

thecellar-WEB-1One of our resolutions this year here at Bottles is to find new ways to help you drink better. And we’ve started by expanding our cellar of special wines: the bottles that are iconic and collectible, as well as those that are rare, highly-rated, and have achieved cult status.

Our new Cellar list, over 600 bottles strong and growing, is made up of wines hand selected by Nick, Josh and Eric. Not only are they the wines that you’ll want to buy today and drink in 15 years at your daughter’s college graduation, they’re also the affordable, ready-to-drink-now bottles produced by indie winemakers whose talented work has garnered them a dedicated following.

Some require a minimal monetary commitment, such as a $49 bottle of limited-allocation 2012 Elk Cove “Five Mountain” Willamette Valley Pinot Noir that you could drink this weekend. Other wines at a similar price point are terrific for those just starting to build their home collection.

Then there are those that are certainly an investment in time and money – the $1199.99 2010 Lafite Rothschild that will be great to drink in 2022 comes to mind.

But what all of our Cellar wines have in common is highly-competitive pricing. It’s our goal to get them on your table or in your cellar by offering them to you at better prices than you find most everywhere else. And by you we mean you the everyday wine lover who just wants to drink better, as well as the serious, informed wine collector who’s filling your 3,000+ bottle cellar.

We invite you to come in and browse our new list. Our team members are at the ready to help you select the perfect bottle for your special occasion, whether it be big (a 50th anniversary) or small (take-out with a cherished friend on Saturday night).

Visit our complete list here, and check back often for new additions. For the stories behind these and other bottles, email our Wine Director Nick Shugrue at (401) 372-2030 or nshugrue@bottlesfinewine.com.

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The Top 3 Wine & Chocolate Pairings

Drink wine with chocolate, we say. Not just because it’s Valentine’s Day. But because the two are great together – when you choose wisely – and they should be enjoyed in tandem whenever you’re in the mood. Not just on February 14th.

How to Pair: Though wine and chocolate are great on their own, it can be challenging to make them sing together. For a balanced pairing, select a wine that is sweeter than the chocolate (the percentage of chocolate will give you an idea of its sweetness: The higher the cacao, the lower the sugar/sweetness). When in doubt, pair milk chocolate (high sugar %) with lighter-bodied wines. Pair fuller-bodied, fruit-forward wines with darker chocolate (high cacao %).

And as always, toss all guidelines out the window if your palate tells you otherwise. The best pairing is the one you like.

To help you get your creative juices flowing, here are our top three chocolate and wine pairings:

chocolatecake_wineDark Chocolate Cake with Marenco “Pineto” Brachetto d’Acqui

A prime example that illustrates the beauty of choosing a wine that’s sweeter than the chocolate. This bright red sparkling wine from Piedmont is slightly sweet, with fine citrus blossom and stone fruit notes, all of which complement the cake’s dense, rich flavors and mouthfeel.

chocolatepieces_wineValrhona Chocolate with JL Chave “Mon Coeur” Cotes-du-Rhone

This is a fun one for all you serious dark chocolate lovers. It’s rooted in the trusted “What grows together goes together” wine pairing adage, as Valrhona chocolate is made just miles from where the wine in made, in France’s Rhone Valley. Use the chocolate in your favorite (not so sweet) homemade dessert, or simply let a minimum 70%-cacao square melt on your tongue while sipping this bone dry grenache/syrah blend.

chocstrawberries_wineChocolate Dipped Strawberries with Tintero Moscato d’Asti

Though this fizzy, slightly sweet wine can stand on its own as dessert, we love it when paired with fruit! The fresh, lively character of this white wine, again from Piedmont, is a natural partner to the light, tart strawberry fruit, and the creamy chocolate.

We hope you enjoy our pairings – and encourage you to share your thoughts or ideas on others!

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Comfort Wine for Comfort Food, Part II

Fact: More comfort foods are eaten per capita in January than in any other month. Post-Fact: OK, we have nothing official to back that stat up, but it certainly feels right, doesn’t it?

Because it does so to us, here are more Comfort Wine and Comfort Food pairings that get our team through trying times and blustery weather. They’re the equivalent of the down-filled couch you lose yourself in, the cozy sweater worn fireside, and the hug from a life-long friend.
meinkklang

Meinklang Frizzante Rosé ($19.99), with Chicken & Waffles 
It’s about balance, people. You’ll find me at my happiest when eating piping hot fried chicken with waffles smothered in maple syrup and butter while simultaneously sipping ice-cold, light-as-air, pink bubbles. The fizz cuts through the dish’s richness and the entire composition can make any bad day do a 180. By the way, your chicken & waffles aren’t complete if you’re not drizzling them up with Cholula’s just before consuming. Just sayin’. – Alex

pujol

Pujol Izard Minervois Vieille Vignes ($15.99), with Shepard’s Pie 
The herbal notes you get in every Languedoc wine, combined with the bright lively fruit in this particular bottle, make the Pujol Izard extremely food friendly. It’s particularly great for medium bodied casserole-type dishes, and my favorite, Shepard’s pie.  – Nick

pegoes

Pegoes Red Blend ($6.99), with a Grilled Cheese Sandwich 
I use a ton of butter (and sometimes mayo) on the outside of the bread when making my grilled cheese. To balance all of that rich, creamy and salty goodness, I drink this jammy red, which is bursting with juicy, ripe fruit. And that it is under $7 a bottle is a comfort to my post-holiday wallet, too. -Katie

ciacci

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona Toscana Rosso ($14.99), with Chicken Parmesan 
Ciacci Piccolomini is in the town of Montalcino in Tuscany. The house is best known for their Pianrosso, which is one of the world’s most renowned brunellos. They can’t help but make great wine and this one, their most affordable option, is spectacular! It’s a blend, and has all the elegance of a brunello, but with a bit lighter and fruitier finish. It’s my go-to wine for my favorite comfort food: Chicken Parmesan. Be sure to load up the cheese! – Kate

borealis

Montinore Borealis White Blend ($14.99), with Sauerkraut with Roast Pork and Dumplings
A match made in my own perfect heaven!  Borealis is an organic wine made in Oregon from grapes more traditionally found in Alsace.  Brimming with both ripe fruit and savory flavors, this beautiful wine sings and dances around the rich sauerkraut, dumplings and pork.  This is where New World wine and Old World food collide!  Bam!  -Eric

Comfort Wines: Now, more than ever.

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What’s The Deal With Japanese Whisky?

japanese_whiskey_caps_shortNote: in Japan, as in Scotland, it’s ‘Whisky’, not ‘Whiskey.’

As a category, Japanese Whisky has grown over 200% in the last year alone, and it doesn’t show any signs of slowing. Japan’s major distilleries have won many prestigious awards and accolades over the last decade, often outshining their Scottish and American counterparts. So why haven’t you heard of them? And if you have heard of them, why can’t you find them?

When we opened Bottles more than 6 years ago, we had a slew of beautifully aged Japanese Whiskys on our shelves. 12-year-old expressions from Hakushu, 18- and 21- year-old bottlings from Yoichi, among a handful of others. There they sat, lonely on the shelf, gazing with envy at their Scottish single malt buddies who were out having fun.

As the current whisky boom amped up, more and more people began reading articles about different bourbons, ryes, and malt whiskies. Whisky writers and bloggers could explore new areas of the world that people had previously overlooked. Folks started to pay attention and take the leap of faith to try these ‘new’ whiskies from Japan, or Taiwan, or India, or Tasmania. They found a lot to like, and the bottles started moving off our shelves.

When any distillery makes whisky, it invests a tremendous amount of time and money into each release. The whisky must sit in a barrel for a good long time before it’s ready to be bottled, which means the distillers are also forced to sit and wait for years (and often decades) before they make a profit from that work. It’s easy to understand why, without knowing how successful their bottles would be at market, these distillers produced their whiskys in small quantities. Though some of the world’s oldest distilleries are experienced enough to forecast how much whisky they need to distill today so they can ensure that they have enough to meet demand in 8, 10 or 15 years, a lot of the ‘newer’ Japanese distilleries just didn’t have enough of a track-record to predict this massive growth decades ago. Hence the short supply today.

So now we wait. The master distillers of Japan are working harder than ever, but you can’t make more 18-year-old whisky without waiting 18 years! In the meantime, please try some of the Japanese whiskies that you can buy, now. They are soft, elegant whiskys, based on a Scottish foundation of whisky-making with a distinctly Japanese style of simple elegance & proficiency.

The Distilleries and Their Whiskys

Beam-Suntory operates three distilleries: Yamazaki, Hakushu, & Chita.

-Yamazaki (Japan’s oldest distillery) opened in 1923 at the convergence of the soft waters of the Katsura, Uji, and Kizu rivers. Nestled in this temperate, humid valley, Yamazaki is known as a soft & supple single malt with a unique house character.

-The Hakushu Distillery opened in 1973 in the forests of Mt. Kaikomagatake. Hakushu takes pride in its waters, clean and crisp from rain and snowmelt filtered through granite. These whiskys are notable for the spice flavors they impart in the finish, and an easy way with their oak aging.

-Chita is the workhorse of the Beam-Suntory stable, producing three distinctive world class grain whiskys (mainly used for blending) out of corn and grain. The Chita Single Grain whisky finds it’s voice in many of the blends that Beam-Suntory produces.

japanese_whiskey_suntory_group

Beam-Suntory Toki – $39.99
Toki is a brand-new expression from Beam-Suntory, comprised of the silky body of Chita single grain, Hakushu’s strength & oakiness, and select older malts from Yamazaki for spice and elegance. A light and approachable blend, equally suited to sipping over a large ice cube or mixing in cocktails. They suggest making a highball, we like it in a Whisky Sour.

Beam-Suntory Hibiki Japanese Harmony – $64.99
Another blend from the Chita, Yamazaki, and Hakushu distilleries, Japanese Harmony focuses on a more robust experience, with an emphasis on the flavors that different types of casks can impart. The malts are aged in American white oak, sherry butts, and Japanese Mizunara casks. The results drink very much like a fine Scottish single malt, but with less sherry influence. To be enjoyed neat, or slowly poured over a large ice ball.

Beam-Suntory Hakushu 12 Year – $99.99
This is it. Get it while you can. One of the last 12-year-old single malts from Japan we were able to get our hands on. A beautiful spirit, composed entirely of whisky distilled and aged at Hakushu. Subtly smoky, it has flavors & aromas of basil, pine, and green tea. A little water will coax our fruity flavors like green apple, mint, and kiwi.

Nikka operates two distilleries: Yoichi and Miyagikyo.

-The Yoichi distillery was founded on Hokkaido in 1934. To this day, they craft their whisky in copper pot stills, heated with a direct coal fire – an extremely rare and labor intensive practice that produces wonderful results.

-In 1969, Nikka opened a second distillery, Miyagikyo, on the island of Honshu. Known for its pristine water and myriad waterfalls and hot springs, Miyagikyo produces a single grain whisky of uncommon quality and body.

japanese_whiskey_nikka_groupNikka Coffey Grain – $64.99

Named for the Coffey stills they use to create the whisky (there is no coffee in this whisky!), the Coffey Grain is made primarily from corn, and has an impressively silky body, with a touch of vanilla and citrus. It’s best over the rocks, or in a variation of an old-fashioned or manhattan.

Nikka Coffey Malt – $64.99
The Coffey Malt is extremely unusual – a 100% malted barley spirit run off a continuous still. It has a rich and pleasant body, with a fresh grain quality akin to toasty grape nuts and freshly baked bread. It will stand up to most classic bourbon cocktails – we like it mixed with a splash of Italian Alessio Chinato vermouth.

Nikka Taketsuru Pure Malt – $64.99
The Pure Malt is a delightful blend of spirits from both distilleries. Utilizing a combination of new American, ex-bourbon, and sherry casks, the Pure Malt is much closer to a traditional Scottish malt, with flavors of honey & char, espresso & chocolate, & a final hint of smokiness.

Come by and talk to one of our team members for insight on their favorite bottles – we’re sure you’ll find you’re favorite, too.

 

Kanpai!
-Liam

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Comfort Wine for Comfort Food

There are no two ways about it. 2016 was a doozy. Which is why we’re easing into the new year with the cozy-wool-blanket bottles we call Comfort Wines. They’re the uncomplicated, easy drinking wines we crave when we just want to tune out, sit back, and feed our souls.  Herewith, a few of our team’s favorite Comfort Wine and Comfort Food pairings that do just that.

curator
The Curator Red Blend ($10.99) with Mom’s Beef Stew
“Mom’s hearty beef stew is my favorite dish. The Curator, with its juicy fruit flavors, is my favorite everyday red. I put the two together and get a smile on my face. If it makes you happy, it can’t be that bad. Unless you get the bay leaf in your mouth by accident.” – Mia

hugel

Hugel Pinot Blanc ‘Cuvee Les Amours’ ($17.99) with Mushroom & Asparagus Risotto
“Asparagus has always been a tricky vegetable to pair wine with, but the creaminess of this dish (coupled with mushrooms’ earthiness) really lets the individual components shine. Don’t forget to start your rice off with a splash of this outstanding Pinot Gris – it will help spotlight the wine when it comes time to eat!” – Liam

prima

Primaterra Primitivo ($11.99) with Polenta with Rabe Sausage 
“The rabe sausage is available at Anthony’s Sangwich shop on Admiral street,  across from Lasalle Bakery. It is the best. I pair it with the full-bodied Primaterra Primitivo. You can’t go wrong with this one.” – Don

pouilly

Louis Latour Pouilly-Fuisse  ($27.99) with Pa Ralph’s Ultimate Chicken Soup
“When the weather turns wet, icy and raw, I need a healthy dose of my father’s chicken soup to warm me up!  And with its great blend of roasted chicken, orzo, cheese and spices, I reach for a white Burgundy.  More specifically a great Pouilly-Fuisse like Latour’s. Its slight touch of oak doesn’t dominate the chardonnay, but instead adds a note of creaminess that is the perfect marriage for the world’s best chicken soup.” – Josh

Stay tuned next week for another batch of our favorite Comfort Wines.

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